Cat Bates

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  • Bone Shoulder Necklace

Bone Shoulder Necklace

3,000.00
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Bone Shoulder Necklace

3,000.00

This one of a kind necklace features a sculpted centerpiece set on a hand knotted cord and finished with a hand fabricated sister clip clasp.

Silver, Brass, Waxed Polyester

Cord is 20"

Ready to ship

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This one of a kind necklace features a sculpted centerpiece set on a hand knotted cord and finished with a hand fabricated sister clip clasp.

Silver, Brass, Waxed Polyester

Cord is 20"

Ready to ship

 
 

To sculpt the 'bone' elements of this necklace I photographed the solder blades from the fox skeleton, then used the computer to manipulate the photographs. I used these images as reference as I carved abstractions of the shoulder blades in wax. The casting of the pieces was sourced to a small casting company on Jeweler's row in Philadelphia (I was living in Philly at the time).

The castings were assembled (along with a few fabricated elements) to create the centerpiece. The cord was made using Overhand Grafting. Overhand Grafting is a decorative and durable knotting technique, which results in a remarkably dense yet smooth cord. The sister clip clasp was fabricated from brass stock and carved to shape.

This is a heavy piece of jewelry, weighing over two ounces, but the thickness of the cord makes it quite comfortable to wear. The centerpiece hangs just below the collar bone on most people.

In the fall of 2010 I took a long distance bicycle trip. Thanksgiving day I stopped just outside of Manning, South Carolina to look for a camp site. I entered the woods via an overgrown road. Down the road a few hundred yards, and after a few turns, I spotted a skeleton in the leaves. Skeletons are a major aesthetic influence on my artwork, and evoke strong memories of my family and my childhood. Coming across the skeleton I felt like that place in the woods was a perfect temporary home. That night I talked to my younger brother on the phone as I cooked my Thanksgiving feast. I carried the skeleton with me for the rest of the trip, drawing it and pondering it's form from time to time. I learned later that the skeleton was from a fox. The silver 'bones' in this piece are based loosely on the shoulder blades from that skeleton.